Wholesale Raw CBD Oil Buy Kline South Carolina

Understanding Cannabinoids: CBN vs CBD

While there are many cannabinoids that may enhance the therapeutic effects of hemp products, the most common renowned product is the phytochemicals in the Cannabis genus that contain the tetrahydrocannabinol or THC. This is the substance that is responsible for all of the psychoactive effects of cannabis. CBD has long been associated with the variety that offers up the best help benefits without offering up the high that the THC gives to users.

While the CBD may not be the feature that is in all of the hemp products, it’s a by-product of the THC. Hemp Genix, Wholesale CBD Oil in Kline, has 80% purity compared to competitors at 17%-40%.  The CBN doesn’t bind to the body’s cannabinoid receptors like the THC does. It’s long been known to give a stronger sedative effect when it’s used in combination with the THC.

wholesale cbd oil colorado

At Hemp Genix, all of our products are made with 100 percent USA, Zero THC and 80 percent purity Wholesale full-spectrum CBD oil in Kline. This is carefully derived from a variety of cultivars of hemp which contain an abundance of cannabinoids.

A lot of people are very familiar with CBD or Cannabidiol. This is found in highly concentrated amounts in a variety of products. However, there are lots of cannabinoids that are found in hemp. These have shown a variety of benefits in studies. All of our products offer you full-spectrum hemp oil. This also includes all of our cannabinoids that are found in the plant. We don’t want you to miss out on any of the benefits.

 

Wholesale Cannabidiol CBD in Kline

This is the most abundant cannabinoid in the hemp oil. It makes up 90 percent of the content of cannabinoid. It’s non-psychoactive and the focus is on how it benefits the body via the hemp oil. It has minimal affinity for CB1 or CB2 receptors. The main focus on interaction is in the endocannabinoid system and it acts as an indirect antagonist toward the cannabinoid antagonists. This, in turn, may allow the CBD to temper the high that is caused through the THC. Wholesale CBD Oil in Kline from Hemp Genix are over 80 percent pure and CBD makes up the majority of the Oils weight. Industry averages and nearly all of the other products with cannabinoids and brands average in at 17 to 40 percent purity.

wholesale cbd oil uk

What’s The Difference Between CBD And CBN?

Cannabis has a number of cannabinoids in which the most abundant are the levels of THC. There are 9 tetrahydrocannabinol as well as CBD and CBN. This is the active ingredient that makes you high. The THC is in the plant and the CBD is the precursor and the CBN is the metabolite of the THC. As the cannabis ages, the THC level breaks down into the CBN.

 

This also leads researchers to believe that the CBD might give some protection against ecstasy-derived neurotoxins or long-term depletion of the serotonergic receptions. While this is still speculation, it’s investigating further. The CBD is usually present in significant enough quantities in such products as hashish or cannabis resins. However,r it’s also in the herbal cannabis referred to as skunk in smaller amounts.

Overall, the CBN is a great cannabinoid that offers up a varied range of therapeutic applications that work together with the rest of the “team” in order to offer up the best possible results. Clearly, more clinical trials are required to see how else it can benefit patients.

wholesale cbd oil usa

Wholesale CBD Oil in Kline South Carolina

 

With medical marijuana legal in 23 states and Washington, D.C, there are now millions of card-carrying cannabis users working at companies across the U.S. But pot is still illegal under federal law, and many business owners still subscribe to the plant's Reefer Madness stigma and don't want to allow people to smoke on the job. For some of those owners, that can mean getting sued for failing to accommodate an employee who has a medical condition.

Regardless of how you feel about marijuana, there are certain rules employees and employers need to follow when it comes to drugs in the workplace. If you make a mistake, you could find yourself in court. Todd Wulffson, a partner at California-based employment and labor law firm Carothers DiSante & Freudenberger, is one of the many lawyers who have been busy defending employers in these types of cases. Wulffson says that to protect your business you need to update your employment policies and human resources programs, and train all managers.

First, you need to be familiar with the laws that have been passed in your state and consider a drug policy that doesn't prohibit employees from using cannabis on their own time. With 86 percent of Americans supporting medical marijuana, an overly restrictive policy may chase some of your workers to another employer. Marijuana, while still classified as a Schedule I drug without medical use, does have medical benefits, and a bipartisan bill to make medical marijuana legal on the federal level has been introduced in the Senate. 

Until then, you need to take steps to avoid becoming a target of an employee lawsuit (whether the employee would have a strong case or not). "There are four scenarios that play out in these types of lawsuits that I see over and over again," Wulffson says. See the details below to find out what moves your company should make in each case.

1. Innocent inquiry

The first scenario is when an employee or an applicant innocently asks the question "'I just wanted to know, would you accommodate my use of medical marijuana?'" "That's a loaded question because you have to accommodate the underlying disability of the medical condition," Wulffson says. "But you don't have to accommodate being stoned at work."

If the query is put to the human resources department, the HR person should tell the employee that the company will accommodate his condition. At the same time, the employee should explain his condition, the treatment, and exactly what kind of accommodation he needs so you can have a dialogue about it. Where most companies falter is when a manager doesn't know the company policy and speaks out of turn.

"If an employee asks a line manager, they could easily say, 'Hell no! We don't accommodate stoners! You can't be stoned at work!'" Then the employee says, "Gee, I got glaucoma and I was hoping you'd accommodate my condition." If the manager doesn't tell the employee to go talk to HR and fires them, Wulffson warns, the result may be a lawsuit.

2. An ill employee stoned at work

The second scenario, Wulffson says, is when an employee with a serious disease is under the influence at work and gets called on the carpet: "The employee will say, 'I am getting treated for cancer and I am going through chemo. The only thing that helps is medical marijuana and I had to smoke a bowl at lunch to keep from throwing up. I am really sorry, I'll do something light until it wears off.'" Wulffson says that although you may have sympathy for the employee's situation, the only way to protect yourself from litigation is to institute a zero-tolerance policy for the use of any drugs, including medical marijuana, while at work.

Keep in mind, however, that if you are in a state that mandates employers accommodate medical marijuana (i.e., Arizona, Delaware, or Minnesota) you cannot fire a medical marijuana card-holding employee for a positive marijuana test. While it is indeed advisable to have a drug policy prohibiting marijuana use during work hours, you don't need to know about what employees are doing on their own time.

3. The future smoker

Wulffson says he's currently representing three clients who are in this situation: The employee comes to you and says she's suffering from anxiety or glaucom and needs to deal with the symptoms. She tells you she's about to go outside, walk 50 feet away from the building, smoke, and come back. "They're telling you they're going to do it, but they are not stoned right now, so you don't have the right to fire them right now," he says. "But, invariably, the manager says, 'No, no, no, no. Go home, stay home, you're fired.'" 

Wulffson says you should not allow the employee to smoke while at work, but you can make allowances. Say something like this: "We will reasonably accommodate your condition, but we cannot allow you to be under the influence while on the clock--it's too risky for the company. You can go home for the rest of the day and come back tomorrow."

4. Social media smokers

Here, an employee goes on Facebook or Twitter and sees pictures of an applicant smoking a joint. The employee then emails the hiring manager to discourage him from hiring the person. When the candidate finds out you saw the photos, Wulffson says, "that's when they claim you didn't hire them because of either a perceived disability" and/or because you don't want to provide an accommodation for them

You might find this is frivolous, but there are lawyers out there looking to cash in. "There is a cottage industry of lawyers that do nothing but bring claims related to medical marijuana against employers," Wulffson says. "Google 'medical marijuana rights' and you'll find 50 lawyers who write well-written letters about how you didn't accommodate the employee and you're getting sued for hundreds of millions of dollars, but today they'll take $15,000 to go away."

The takeaway

Wulffson says these lawsuits are catching a lot of employers off guard because of the confusion over medical marijuana laws. "It may be legal in many states, but it's still a federal crime," he says. California and other states will not prosecute someone with a medical card who is carrying less than a certain amount, but that's not a blanket permission. "You can't go on federal property, you can't work for a federal employer," he says. "'Don't work for a federal contractor because you could be fired and maybe jailed."

When it comes to drug use at work--whether it is an employee with cancer smoking marijuana or one popping Xanax to deal with anxiety--Wulffson suggests you should adopt a simple, straightforward company policy that reads something like this: "We don't allow the use of, the possession, or being under the influence of any illegal drug in the workplace. 'Illegal drug' is defined as 'the abuse of over-the-counter medication, prescription medication, medical marijuana, and alcohol."

Additionally, Wulffson says, make sure you train all of your managers to answer questions. "If anything from any employee looks, sounds, or smells like they have a medical condition or medical marijuana issue, refer them to HR," he says. "The biggest issue I see is that companies don't get the word out and the line managers say and do things that get the company sued."

Whoopi Goldberg Gets Into the Marijuana Business 

Down the dirt roads on the hills of Northern California, where small farmers have been growing marijuana and evading the authorities for decades, the anticipation before election day, when the state will vote on a recreational marijuana ballot, is high. But many of the farmers will vote "no" on Proposition 64, the statewide ballot measure that could legalize marijuana for adults over 21. The farmers want marijuana to be legal, but they think the proposed law puts big business interests ahead of the small farmer.

Ruby Steinbrecher, a lawyer and the chair of the Sonoma County Growers Alliance, an advocacy and educational group for marijuana cultivation businesses in California, says many long-time marijuana farmers from Sonoma and up to Humboldt County will vote no on 64, which will propose the passage of the Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), on Tuesday.

"There is a big fear that the big interests are about to come in and crush the small growers," says Steinbrecher. "We know consolidation is coming, we know things will change, but we don't want the small businesses that have been around for a long time to go away completely because this is the culture of who we are and what we do. We need to protect it."

The main complaint about the Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA) is that it is not as friendly to the small farmers as the medical marijuana laws are. If passed, the California state government will issue unlimited growing licenses in five years time, which means big companies will be able to buy as many licenses as they want to create mega-marijuana farms.

Another issue, says Steinbrecher, is that farmers in Northern California, most of whom have been cultivating marijuana long before the laws started to change, are just learning how to deal with the new medical regulation laws passed under the Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act in 2015, which gave the industry a much needed clear and robust framework to support a legal industry. The new recreational laws add confusion to that process, she says.

"We are just wrapping our heads around the new medical laws passed last year," says Steinbrecher​. "We are busy focusing on that and throwing in new regulations for a recreational market adds a thick layer of complications and issues to the huge paradigm shift of legalization."

California has long operated in a gray market. In 1996, voters passed Proposition 215, which legalized medical marijuana but did not offer a framework or regulatory body to manage the industry. As California's industry becomes legitimate, the farmers need to change the way they have done business for years.

"Many people never kept business records as a precaution [in case of a police raid]. If you were cultivating cannabis, you'd keep business records on scraps of paper and burn them after the harvest," says Steinbrecher, who is also the president of Madrone California, a collective of small marijuana farmers who have come together to help each other stay compliant under the new laws. "Legalization is overwhelming; we need more time to adapt."

According to polls, Proposition 64 is likely to pass in California. If it does, that means marijuana would be legal for recreational use in every state along the west coast of the U.S. The ArcView Group, a network of marijuana angel investors, says if California passes a law for recreational use, the national marijuana market could go from $7 billion last year to $22 billion in four years. There are similar measures in Arizona, Nevada, Maine, and Massachusetts. As for medical marijuana, Florida, North Dakota, Arkansas, and Montana are voting to legalize medical use. But as California is estimated to grow the bulk of the country's marijuana, all eyes are on the state to see what happens. If California legalizes recreational use, there is a good chance that many other states will follow in the coming years, which will in turn put more pressure on the federal government to change federal law.

Hezekiah Allen, who grew up on his family's marijuana ranch in Honey Dew, California, sold the land and started lobbying for small marijuana farmers and businesses in 2014, with his group the California Growers Association. He has fought to get many concessions for small businesses included in the medical regulation laws passed under the Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act in 2015. He says if AUMA passes he will have to start working to get farmer-friendly regulations amended into the new law. The group has a neutral stance on 64, but he says he will vote no.

"Is the goal to make marijuana millionaires? Or to make all these criminals in the hills small-business owners? We want to make business owners out of the farmers who have been working in the shadows for decades," says Allen.

He is also against the rule that allows companies to buy unlimited number of licenses in five years, as he believes it will beget mega cannabis corporations that will threaten the livelihoods of small farmers.

"Small farms are good for California. Right now, the state is home to a diverse group of boutique and craft farms, but 64 will accelerate consolidation," says Allen. "It's going to be messy, it'll be a fight, but I am not discouraged. We will just work to put amendments in that will support small business."

Another aspect of AUMA that Allen believes goes against small businesses is a flat tax structure across the industry; multimillion-dollar businesses will be taxed at the same rate as a boutique grower. The taxes under AUMA will be imposed at harvest, so cultivators will have to pay before getting it inspected for quality and potency, which could end up hurting farmers if the yield doesn't turn out as planned or if mold or pests infest the flowers. This could hurt a small-business owner who lives harvest to harvest, says Allen.

Allen says AUMA does have positive aspects, including the fact that most people will not go jail for marijuana offenses. But much of the work he did to help support small businesses got undone as the campaign raised $20 million to get on the ballot and pay for ads, Allen says.

Another aspect of legalization that farmers will have to get used to, Steinbrecher says, is a shift in culture and attitudes towards the government. She grew up around marijuana cultivators and says she is excited for the industry to become a legitimate part of the economy. But the farmers, who have been persecuted by drug agents dropping out of helicopters to cut down pot crops and arrest the owners since the start of the domestic drug war, are just learning how to trust and deal with the government and regulators, she says. The isolated communities of the hills, the main producers of marijuana sold in retail shops in San Francisco and Los Angeles, want to be licensed and regulated, but in order for it to work, she says, all the farmers need to be on board. But since 64 has been divisive, she says if California doesn't move into legalization slowly, many farmers will just continue operating in the black market.

"We need to show that legalization works and that the government isn't this big, scary man," says Steinbrecher. "Once the farmers all have their licenses and know they will not be busted anymore, that's when it's time to expand to recreational. This will take time."


South Carolina Wholesale CBD Oil Facilities

Home