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Understanding Cannabinoids: CBN vs CBD

While there are many cannabinoids that may enhance the therapeutic effects of hemp products, the most common renowned product is the phytochemicals in the Cannabis genus that contain the tetrahydrocannabinol or THC. This is the substance that is responsible for all of the psychoactive effects of cannabis. CBD has long been associated with the variety that offers up the best help benefits without offering up the high that the THC gives to users.

While the CBD may not be the feature that is in all of the hemp products, it’s a by-product of the THC. Hemp Genix, Wholesale CBD Oil in Batesburg-Leesville, has 80% purity compared to competitors at 17%-40%.  The CBN doesn’t bind to the body’s cannabinoid receptors like the THC does. It’s long been known to give a stronger sedative effect when it’s used in combination with the THC.

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At Hemp Genix, all of our products are made with 100 percent USA, Zero THC and 80 percent purity Wholesale full-spectrum CBD oil in Batesburg-Leesville. This is carefully derived from a variety of cultivars of hemp which contain an abundance of cannabinoids.

A lot of people are very familiar with CBD or Cannabidiol. This is found in highly concentrated amounts in a variety of products. However, there are lots of cannabinoids that are found in hemp. These have shown a variety of benefits in studies. All of our products offer you full-spectrum hemp oil. This also includes all of our cannabinoids that are found in the plant. We don’t want you to miss out on any of the benefits.

 

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This is the most abundant cannabinoid in the hemp oil. It makes up 90 percent of the content of cannabinoid. It’s non-psychoactive and the focus is on how it benefits the body via the hemp oil. It has minimal affinity for CB1 or CB2 receptors. The main focus on interaction is in the endocannabinoid system and it acts as an indirect antagonist toward the cannabinoid antagonists. This, in turn, may allow the CBD to temper the high that is caused through the THC. Wholesale CBD Oil in Batesburg-Leesville from Hemp Genix are over 80 percent pure and CBD makes up the majority of the Oils weight. Industry averages and nearly all of the other products with cannabinoids and brands average in at 17 to 40 percent purity.

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What’s The Difference Between CBD And CBN?

Cannabis has a number of cannabinoids in which the most abundant are the levels of THC. There are 9 tetrahydrocannabinol as well as CBD and CBN. This is the active ingredient that makes you high. The THC is in the plant and the CBD is the precursor and the CBN is the metabolite of the THC. As the cannabis ages, the THC level breaks down into the CBN.

 

This also leads researchers to believe that the CBD might give some protection against ecstasy-derived neurotoxins or long-term depletion of the serotonergic receptions. While this is still speculation, it’s investigating further. The CBD is usually present in significant enough quantities in such products as hashish or cannabis resins. However,r it’s also in the herbal cannabis referred to as skunk in smaller amounts.

Overall, the CBN is a great cannabinoid that offers up a varied range of therapeutic applications that work together with the rest of the “team” in order to offer up the best possible results. Clearly, more clinical trials are required to see how else it can benefit patients.

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Wholesale CBD Oil in Batesburg-Leesville South Carolina

What do conference room names have to do with the culture of positivity?

More than you think.

A company's office speaks loudly about not just the company itself but also its leadership and its culture. Little things--like how internal traditions or employees' accomplishments are displayed, how people communicate with one another, and little things in the office that would make people smile, such as conference room names and funny pictures of co-workers--all have a huge impact on the overall culture of the firm.

Several researchers, including J.M. George in his article published in Human Relations and P. Totterdell in his article in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, claim that a negative mood moves people into an entirely different way of thinking and acting. When people are feeling negative, they become critical of one another, which inhibits creative problem-solving. Negative people focus on the wrong. Contrariwise, a positive mood and attitude stimulates people to be creative, constructive, and generous. Positive attitude drives people to focus on the right solution vs. what's wrong.

One of the ways to promote the attitude of positivity within your company is to pay attention to every little opportunity to motivate people on an everyday basis. One of these (usually missed) opportunities is conference-room naming.

I could never understand the companies that blindly number the rooms and moved on. It is such an extraordinary opportunity to infuse positive and inspirational language into your employees' daily interactions and reinforce great experiences within your culture.

At Sprinklr, our conference rooms are named after the company's values. Honesty, Passion, Perseverance, Humility, Character, Courage, and Integrity are just some of the names you will encounter. My personal favorites are Awesomeness and 1+1=3. When I asked our founder, Ragy Thomas, why the leadership team chose to name conference rooms in this way, he said: "It would be kind of hard to be arrogant in a room named Humility, wouldn't it? Or give up in a room named Perseverance, don't you think?"

If you don't use conference room names to reinforce what is most important to you, you are wasting precious mindshare opportunity. Come to think of it--what other opportunities do you have to compel every employee to use these words over and over almost every day?

HubSpot is another company that takes conference-room naming seriously. The firm started with a tradition of naming conference rooms after people who inspire its founders, Dharmesh Shah and Brian Halligan. Most were marketers (Seth Godin, Guy Kawasaki), business icons (Steve Jobs, Marc Benioff, Mark Zuckerberg), and role models (Gail Goodman, Warren Buffett), the kinds of people you'd admire at a fast-growing marketing software startup.

As HubSpot expanded into more parts of the building and built out other floors and offices over the years, the theme of "people who inspire us" continued and expanded to include more of the company's personal heroes. Engineering and product teams chose to name their rooms after iconic computer scientists and designers. Customer-reseller partner Paul Roetzer was the first customer to get a room named after him. The company's nap room is called Van Winkle. Company satellite offices in Ireland and Australia chose to name theirs after global (Bezos, Jobs, Musk, and Branson) and more local (Kennedy, Heaney, Guinness, Boole) business inspirations. The team is especially proud of having more than a handful of conference rooms in the mix that are named after great women who inspire them: Renee Mauborgne, Gail Goodman, Mary Meeker, Sheryl Sandberg, Nancy Duarte, Kathy Sierra, and many others.

The buildings at eBay's HQ in Campbell, California, are all named after categories on eBay.com: Collectibles, Community, Motors, Music, Sports, Technology, and Toys. All of the conference rooms are named in accordance with the theme of the buildings in which they're located--and are decorated with items bought on ebay.com. Rooms in Sports are named after stadiums, players, and sports; rooms in Music are named after various instruments and musicians. To go one step further, employees decorate the conference room of executives with items bought on eBay that reflect the personality and name of the individual.

To sum it up, take every little opportunity to consistently showcase your culture and infuse the positive language that reflects your culture and your values into your physical surroundings and employees' daily interactions. Enabling great experiences for your employees will enable great experiences for your customers.

Angel Investor Directory For Marijuana and CBD Oil Companies

Editor's note: This article is part of Inc.'s 2015 Best Industries report.

In the beginning, Pete Williams grew medical marijuana in his basement. He grew strains with names like White Widow and Sour Diesel, and it was good. Eventually, Pete's older brother Andy joined him and the business soon became too big for the basement. Five years later, Medicine Man is one of the largest and most successful cannabis dispensaries in the state of Colorado. With two retail locations, one in Denver and the other in Aurora, the company produced 7,000 pounds of pot and made $8 million in revenue in 2014. 

The Williams brothers--along with their sister, Sally Vander Veer, who helped with Medicine Man's launch and came on as CFO in 2013--are one of the many success stories in Colorado's $1.5 billion legal weed industry. According to a report by Convergex Group, the state's 300 licensed marijuana businesses generated $350 million in revenue in 2014, a figure that's expected to grow by 20 percent this year. 

Out of the basement.

In 2008, the recession crippled Pete's custom tile business. After 18 years of marriage, he and his wife got divorced, and he needed to make money to support his two children. A friend gave him 16 pot plants, each one small enough to fit inside a Dixie cup, and told him there's good money in "caregiving," or growing weed for medical patients. A born tinkerer, Pete built a complex grow system incorporating hydroponics and aeroponics techniques. That first year, he made $100,000 out of his basement selling to dispensaries.

President Obama declared state-legalized medical cannabis a "low priority" for law enforcement the following year. That's when Andy came down to the basement with a plan. "I'll be the businessman and you be the green thumb," Andy, now the president and chief executive of Medicine Man, remembers telling Pete.

With a loan of just over a half-million dollars from their mother, the brothers leased a 20,000-square-foot space in a warehouse in Denver's Montbello neighborhood and built a state-of-the-art hydroponics-based system. At that time, the brothers were selling wholesale, but in December 2010 a new law was enacted requiring cannabis growers to sell their product directly to customers. Andy and Pete built a dispensary in the front of the warehouse and ceased their wholesale business.  

By 2013 Medicine Man was able to buy the warehouse and had generated $4 million in revenue. But with the legalization of recreational marijuana on the horizon, Andy knew the company needed to raise more money to expand their grow facility and up production in preparation for a spate of new customers. He pitched cannabis angel investor network ArcView Group in California and secured $1.6 million in funding. 

"Andy was the right entrepreneur at the right time for an investment opportunity. At the end of the day, it's clear Andy thought all the way through the pieces of the puzzle," says ArcView CEO Troy Dayton. (Neither Dayton nor ArcView is a Medicine Man investor.) "In a nascent industry, companies get traction not only when they are early but when they are a great business and composed of great people--Andy has both." 

On January 1, 2014, the first day sales of recreational marijuana were officially legal, Medicine Man sold 15 pounds of pot and made close to $100,000. Meanwhile Pete, Andy, and Sally have been looking ahead to a day when cannabis becomes legal nationwide. To ensure another revenue stream, the trio created Medicine Man Technologies, a consulting firm that offers turnkey packages to entrepreneurs who want to start pot business. Medicine Man Technologies, which has helped clients build medical facilities in New York, Illinois, Florida, and Nevada, will become a publicly traded company on the over-the-counter market this summer.

The challenges of being a potpreneur. 

In spite of the safe haven Colorado has created, pot businesses still face at least two major hurdles: First, until major banks decide it's safe to bring on marijuana clients, the businesses must deal exclusively in cash. Medicine Man, which says it brought in $50,000 a day in December, has had to invest heavily in security measures. Its two locations are equipped with a total of more than 100 cameras trained inside and out, as well as bulletproof glass and doors. The company has also hired security company Blue Line Protection Group to supply armed guards for the dispensaries and warehouses, and armored trucks to run money from the safe to pay bills, the government, and vendors. 

Cannabusinesses also face extremely high taxes, in some cases exceeding 50 percent. But thanks to Pete's super-efficient grow operation, which produces a gram of marijuana for the comparatively low cost of $2.50, Medicine Man has been able to slash prices for the customer while staying profitable--so even after the state takes its cut, the company's margins are 30 to 40 percent, Sally says. 

Exit strategy.

It's easy to look at the Williamses, or watch them on MSNBC's reality show Pot Barons of Colorado, and believe they have the life. The trio seem to be sitting on top of the Mile High City's legal weed industry, but they didn't get up there without personal sacrifice. For example, Andy's decision to give up a stable job to launch Medicine Man cost him his marriage.  

"One thing people don't understand is that the entrepreneurs who started the industry in Denver are pioneers in the truest sense. What it takes to be a pioneer is vision, the ability to see something, and the courage to go after it despite the risks," he says. "The risks weren't just about money--they were about our reputations, our freedom, and our families. People risked everything for it."

After years of dealing with all those risks and sacrifices, the Williamses now say they're ready to put their feet up and enjoy the rewards of building the "Costco of marijuana." The siblings are currently in talks with private equity firms regarding an acquisition. They put the current value of the 80-employee business at $30 million, and say it will bring in $15 to $18 million in revenue in 2015.

"We began this whole thing with an end game in mind," Pete says. "We're all in our late 40s and we don't want to work for the rest of our lives." 

He adds that they're willing to sell their majority stake, but they'd like to hang on to 5 to 10 percent. "If we don't sell out, [an acquiring company] will buy our biggest competitor," he says. "If we hook up with the right people, Medicine Man can be a household name like Pepsi or Coke. [People will say,] 'Go get me a pack a Medicine Mans, honey.'"


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